Universiteit Leiden

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Psychology

Research

The Institute of Psychology stimulates leading international research. The Institute has a large number of research projects, all of which are of outstanding quality, despite the selective allocation of financial resources. The Institute strives to achieve a good balance between knowledge-driven and society-driven research.

Research programmes

  1. Action control
  2. Social decision-making
  3. Self-regulation models
  4. Pathways through adolescence
  5. Multivariate analysis 

Research projects

The important research projects of the Institute of Psychology are a result of the quality and interests of the senior staff members. The development of research projects is related to research already conducted and to changes in the composition of the academic staff.

Multidisciplinairy research  

More importance is being given to a multidisciplinary approach, for example in the newest section Health, Medical and Neuropsychology.

Research schools

Researchers work in their areas of interest in national research schools. These research  schools are partnerships between universities.

Research funding

It is difficult to make funds available for new areas of research. There is a bit more flexibility for PhD students through grants, for example from the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (KNAW).

Profile areas

The Institute of Psychology takes part in excellent research and multidisciplinairy teamwork in two Leiden University profile areas:  

Self-Assessment:

Our research programme conducted in the period 2011-2016 has been assessed by an international review committee. As preparation for that assessment, we have written a self-evaluation of our research programme. Download the self-evaluation and the appendices.

The Full Assessment Report from the Review Committee and the response from the Institute of Psychology to that report can be found on the university website under the heading 'Social and Behavioural Sciences, Psychology 2011-2016'.

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