Universiteit Leiden

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Manon de Visser

PhD candidate

Name
M.C. de Visser MSc
Telephone
+31 71 527 4882
E-mail
m.c.de.visser@biology.leidenuniv.nl

For her PhD, Manon aims to unravel the mysteries underlying the evolutionary enigma of the balanced lethal system, together with her co-workers at IBL and Naturalis Biodiversity Center. Her focus is on Triturus newts. In 2018 Manon obtained her Masters degree in Biology at Wageningen University with a double specialization: conservation/ecology and evolution/genomics.

More information about Manon de Visser

Brief biography

In 2015 Manon obtained her BSc degree in Biology at the University of Utrecht after concluding a research essay and thesis that focused on the influence of global warming on the development of sea turtle eggs. In 2018 she obtained her MSc Degree in Biology at the University of Wageningen, where she invested in a double specialization and concluded two Major thesis and two Major internship projects. In one of the theses, she worked on whole-genome data of the pygmy hog (Porcula salvania), the smallest and most threatened pig species in the world. Before her PhD started, Manon worked for a molecular research agency and as an ecological consultant within the Netherlands. Also, she has been involved with several volunteering jobs over the years in order to raise awareness regarding biodiversity loss and the need to protect threatened or relatively susceptible species. Currently, Manon is still involved as a volunteer for the Jane Goodall Institute Netherlands.

'I am fascinated by the resilience of nature, even though it is clear it sometimes needs our support. I believe that the successes in investigating and protecting the natural world, two of our greatest duties, in my opinion, are mostly based on the basic principles of thinking out of the box and working together.' After her PhD on the evolution of balanced lethal systems in Triturus newts, Manon aims to pursue a career in conservation genomics or evolutionary genomics.

Research

Amphibians are relatively understudied in the field of genomics due to their gigantic genome sizes. Nevertheless, the Wielstra lab aims to unravel the evolutionary enigma that is the balanced lethal system by looking at the DNA of Triturus newts as a case study, where half of the embryos stop developing, no matter the circumstances, in all species. In a balanced lethal system, individuals require two different types of chromosome in order to survive: this means all heterozygotes get to live (50%), whilst homozygotes die (50%, as observed in the newts). This seems to defy evolutionary theory as natural selection should generally not allow for the existence of such a disadvantageous phenomenon. Manon's research, therefore, includes reconstructing the ancestral state of the dimorphic chromosome in question. By applying phylogenetic approaches, she will investigate the evolution of the system and how it was manifested in the most recent common ancestor of Triturus. Also, she focusses on finding candidate lethal genes that cause death in inviable embryos. She will use sequence capture techniques (DNA-seq) and gene expression patterns (RNA-seq) to overcome the current challenges of working with relatively large genomes.

Prizes

1st prize for oral presentation within subtheme: “Global Health - Humans and Animals" at the University of Copenhagen EuroLeague of Life Sciences (ELLS) Student Conference 2017, for the MSc project "The Importance of Genomics for the Conservation Management of the Critically Endangered Pygmy Hog (Porcula salvania)".

Best oral presentation at the Benelux International Society of Applied Ethology (ISAE) meeting 2016, for the MSc project "The effect of exposure to visitors on stress in the critically endangered blue-eyed black lemur (Eulemur flavifrons) and other primate species at Apenheul Primate Park, the Netherlands."

PhD candidate

  • Science
  • Instituut Biologie Leiden
  • IBL Animal Sciences

Work address

Sylvius
Sylviusweg 72
2333 BE Leiden
Room number 3.5.17

Contact

Publications

No relevant ancillary activities

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