Universiteit Leiden

nl en

Research project

Social Anxiety and School Refusal

When and how does social anxiety develop? How can it go astray in some adolescents?
How can we help troubled young people to attend school regularly and return to a normal developmental pathway?

Contact
Michiel Westenberg

Social Anxiety
One of the key vulnerabilities in adolescence is social anxiety, defined as an extreme fear for the opinions of others and the avoidance of social situations. In some ways, this development can be seen as a healthy and normal transition where adolescents eventually learn to cope with social fears and become adults with mature social goals. Yet, for some adolescents social anxiety is so prevalent that it has severe social and psychological consequences.

When and how social anxiety develops and how it can go astray is the core focus of our research program. We target this question using a unique approach; we investigate how and when the maturation of behavior and brain function is related to genes versus environment in a socially complex and changing world.

Principal Investigator: Prof. Michiel Westenberg, PhD 

 

School Refusal
A special focus of this research is on school refusal, an extreme form of social avoidance behavior with direct implications for education and health programs. School refusal may be related to social anxiety, depression, or other forms of psychopathology. We have developed a new treatment protocol to help troubled young people to attend school regularly and return to a normal developmental pathway – a path along which they can succeed academically and do well emotionally and socially.

Principal Investigator: David Heyne, PhD

 

Connection with other research