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Ingrid Leijten publishes book Core Socio-Economic Rights and the European Court of Human Rights

Recently, Ingrid Leijten’s book Core Socio-Economic Rights and the European Court of Human Rights was published with Cambridge University Press. The monograph was published in the series Cambridge Studies in European Law and Policy (edited by Laurence Gormley and Jo Shaw) and deals with the protection of socio-economic rights by the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR).

Author
Ingrid Leijten
Date
03 April 2018

In her book, Leijten asks the question how the supranational ECtHR should deal with sensitive socio-economic cases concerning issues like housing, health care and social security. The European Convention on Human Rights covers civil and political rights, but due to a broad interpretation and the indivisibility of human rights, it increasingly touches upon social issues. In this regard, Leijten investigates the idea of core rights protection in diverse human rights and constitutional contexts. She argues that the ECtHR should guarantee core socio-economic rights in order to protect vulnerable individuals’ and groups’ essential needs without thereby overstepping the boundaries of its legitimate task.

The cover text of the book reads as follows:

‘Core Socio-Economic Rights and the European Court of Human Rights deals with socio-economic rights in the context of the jurisprudence of the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR). The book connects the ECtHR's socio-economic case law to an understanding of the Court's responsibility to recognize the limitations of supranational rights adjudication while protecting the most needy. By exploring the idea of core rights protection in constitutional and international law, a new perspective is developed that offers suggestions for improving the ECtHR's reasoning in socio-economic cases as well as contributing to the debate on indivisible rights adjudication in an age of 'rights inflation' and proportionality review. Core Socio-Economic Rights and the European Court of Human Rights will interest scholars and practitioners dealing with fundamental rights and especially those interested in judicial reasoning, socio-economic and supranational rights protection.’

The monograph is available as hardback and eBook. More information can be found on the e website of Cambridge University Press.

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