Universiteit Leiden

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Dissertation

Ecology of the Ethiopian wolf (Canis simensis Rüppell 1835) in a changing landscape: Human carnivore interactions in Afroalpine ecosystems of Ethiopia

Ethiopian wolves are endangered diurnal Afroalpine rodent hunters. I investigated the interaction between wolves, rodents and human land use in Borena Sayint National Park (BSNP), Abune Yosef and Aboi Gara in Ethiopia.

Author
Genbere, G.E.
Date
05 September 2017
Links
Thesis in Leiden Repository

Ethiopian wolves are endangered diurnal Afroalpine rodent hunters. I investigated the interaction between wolves, rodents and human land use in Borena Sayint National Park (BSNP), Abune Yosef and Aboi Gara in Ethiopia. I applied scat analysis, interview, questionnaire and rodent-trapping survey methods. In BSNP 94.6% of wolf diet was made up of rodents, medium- sized mammals and others, while only 5.4% comprised livestock. Of all prey 79.2% were diurnal rodents. However, livestock presence indicated predation, which is damaging to livelihoods and perceptions to wolves. Rodent density across BSNP was higher in ungrazed land uses than grazed land and correlated positively to vegetation cover and negatively to livestock presence. In Abune Yosef 80% of local people benefited from natural resources but also suffered from predation by wolves and jackals. However, 66% reported positive attitude towards wolves and 71% recognised ecosystem protection. In Aboi Gara, I assessed extent of predation on small stock, its economic impact, and how it affects attitude towards wolf. Of 140 pastoralists, 70 losing 1.2 head of small stock to wolves and jackals over a year, this represents a loss of 10% herd size, or USD 92 per household. However, 62.1% of pastoralists had positive attitude towards wolves.