Universiteit Leiden

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NWO grant for early dementia detection

NWO honoured Leiden psychologist Jeffrey Durieux with a Research Talent Grant for early dementia detection by identifying differences in resting-state networks.

Increasing sensitivity to identify network alterations

Jeffrey Durieux: 'Our brain is a network of functionally connected brain regions. Functional network integrity may disrupt in the cascade of events leading to dementia before anatomical or cognitive changes become apparent. Increasing sensitivity to identify network alterations therefore may enhance the early detection of dementia.' 

Early changes may be discovered in a data-driven way

To this end, we propose a technique for multi-subject fMRI data that clusters subjects based on within-cluster similarities and between-cluster differences in functional networks. As such, networks sensitive to early changes may be discovered in a data-driven way. We will also investigate how anatomical MRI information can be incorporated into the technique in order to improve its performance.

Research project

Clustering of subjects based on within-cluster similarities and between-cluster differences in connectivity patterns in resting-state brain data to identify dementia related functional networks. 

NWO Research talent 

This responsive mode funding scheme is a platform for talented and ambitious young researchers to pursue a scientific career and carry out high-quality PhD research. NWO offers excellent students within the social and behavioural sciences the opportunity to fulfill their ambitions to conduct PhD research. To this aim a full professors within social and behavioural sciences, and who is also the intended promoter, can submit an application for a grant for these upcoming researchers.
NWO programme Research Talent

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