Universiteit Leiden

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Leiden Academic Centre for Drug Research

Pharmacology

Our research in pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PKPD) modelling focuses on mechanism-based models with excellent extrapolation and prediction properties.

Using mechanism-based PKPD modelling and systems pharmacology approaches we can describe and predict the disposition of drugs. Furthermore by identifying drug-specific and biological-system specific properties the interaction of drugs with disease processes and disease progression can be described.

In addition we focus on the identification of predictors for inter-individual variability in drug response. Together, this model-based approach will provide information crucial for the development of novel drugs and the optimization of drug treatment based on individual patient characteristics.

Our research is organized according to the following three research areas:

 

Translational Pharmacology


The aim of this research area is to be able to predict human drug response on the basis of mathematical models that are developed using preclinical experiments and prior knowledge.

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Currently, the following projects fall under this research area:

 

Clinical Pharmacology


Knowledge on how to adjust a drug dose in special patient populations such as (prematurely born) neonates or children, critically-ill patients, obese individuals, or pregnant women, is not only crucial for novel compounds but also for existing drugs which are often used in an off-label manner.

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Currently, the following projects fall under this research area:

 

Quantitative Systems Pharmacology
 

This research area is focused on the development and application of novel concepts and models in the emerging area of quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP). QSP has been described as the "quantitative analysis of the dynamic interactions between drug(s) and a biological system that aims to understand the behaviour of the system as a whole".

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Currently, the following projects fall under this research area: