Universiteit Leiden

nl en

PhD project

Composing the medial

Developing a model of sound organisation which drives the focus of the listener to the way inherent conditions in the production and circulation of sound media technology constitute our sound apprehension

Contact
G. Paiuk

The purpose of this project is to develop a model of sound organisation which drives the focus of the listener to the way inherent conditions in the production and circulation of sound media technology constitute our sound apprehension.

This perspective understands technology in a broad sense, as always situated within a medial circuit which articulates the physical characteristics of the devices with a set of protocols, rules and habits inherent in the uses of these devices.  In a global context of so called “post-medium” conditions, the medial, rather than being attached to a specific technology, can be understood as the conglomerate of practices, notions of communication, codes and logics of organisation of the sensitive developed around the use of these devices.

Tackling the mediality of sound implies considering that sound apprehension occurs within certain organisations of perception evolved in the articulation of particular technologies and frames of sound production, attending to “how carefully auditory receptivity [had] to be produced […] from schoolroom to concert-hall”[1].

Within this project, the compositional component is a fundamental one, as a tool which, through setting up adjacent sound instances in a way that they reciprocally highlight the material characteristics of its production, investigates the way our apprehension of sound is modulated within medial circuits. Theoretical research is the other fundamental constituent of the research path, as it aims to disentangle the genealogies of the main threads that constitute these circuits.

This project unveils within a context in which the current status of media exposes the variability in the processes of individuation that emerges from roles and practices of sound technology and its circulation. The widespread expansion of recording, reproduction and manipulation technologies has altered fundamental components of our experience of sound, defining new kinds of agencies based on the automatic procedures of sound production, altering the models we use to grasp the spatial in sound, and breeding new sorts of engagement and literacy within the timbral domain.

[1] Connor, S. (2015) “Acousmania”, lecture given at Sound Studies: Art, Experience, Politics, CRASSH, Cambridge, July 2015..

This website uses cookies. More information