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ILS Lunch Seminar with Dr. Moritz Jesse and Helena Ursic LLM

The monthly research lunches have become a regular point on the Law School’s agenda and are steadily developing into somewhat of a tradition. During this lunch seminar series, all researchers from Leiden Law School can present their research. The idea is to hear in a simple and nice way what researchers from other research programs and institutes are working on.

On Thursday 14 December from 12:00 until 13:00 in B0.17 (KOG), the next edition of the monthly ILS Lunch Seminars will take place. The first presentation will be from Dr. Moritz Jesse on “The ‘others’ amongst ‘us’: Thoughts on Western Societies, Otherness, and the Law”. The second presentation will be from Helena Ursic LLM on “Law & the data economy: a modern conflict or alliance? An example of a successful three-year cooperation between Leiden University and the European Commission on the EuDEco project.” For more information, see the abstracts underneath.

Lunch is provided at the monthly seminars. Please contact Daila Gigengack to sign up as a speaker at an ILS lunch seminar or to register as a visitor to be sure of a sandwich!

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The ‘others’ amongst ‘us’: Thoughts on Western Societies, Otherness, and the Law.

During the lunch seminar, I will briefly discuss the following issues: Despite being the starting point of all human interaction in the 21st century, equality is hardly ever unconditional for any group of immigrants. This includes those migrants enjoying the highest grade of protection, such as EU Citizens moving in the EU, or wanted immigrants, such as highly qualified individuals. The message given to immigrants is  always ‘you are equal, but…’, ‘you belong here, but…’, or ‘we want you, but’ (A. Farahat [2009] European Law Journal). Immigrants, in other words, are (consciously or subconsciously) not considered to be a genuine part of the population regardless of the lip service often paid to integration, accommodation, and residence security. The persistence of unequal treatment and conditionality of rights shows that immigrants ‘from out of state’ are not regarded as subjects, but objects, who do not ‘have’ genuine rights in the polis as members of the citizenry, but depend on rights ‘given’ to them by the host society. Full membership of the polis is only acquired through naturalization, which is increasingly becoming more difficult and insecure itself. Such insecurities keep on separating immigrants from the host society implicitly and explicitly and make them ‘the other’ while the proportion of immigrants in societies is increasing. The persistent message of “You are welcome, but…”, will do harm to the integration of receiving society and immigrants and will remain a constant source of social and political unrest.

Law & the data economy: a modern conflict or alliance?

An example of a successful three-year cooperation between Leiden University and the European Commission on the EuDEco project.

To be able to extract the benefits of data, for example to build useful applications and services such as Whatsapp (communication service) and Coinomi (crypto currency wallet), it is first critical to assess the underlying economic, societal, legal, and technological framework conditions and related challenges. This is what the EuDEco project has been doing for the past three years. Centre for Law and Digital Technologies (eLaw) was one of the core partners in this European Commission's funded project. In the ILS lunch lecture, eLaw's researcher Helena Ursic will reflect upon their past work and explain why lawyers were an indispensable part of this complex research project.