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New Article! Exploring the concept of teaching sea travel: Experiences from Valverde and Montecristi, Dominican Republic

A new article entitled 'Exploring the concept of teaching sea travel: Experiences from Valverde and Montecristi, Dominican Republic' was recently published online in the Journal of Community Archaeology & Heritage. This article was written in a joint effort by Eldris Con Aguilar, Emma Slayton, and Corinne L. Hofman. Read the abstract below!

Abstract

This article presents the results of a case study in the Dominican Republic on the educational applications of seascapes as content for teaching about the indigenous peoples, the Amerindians, also referred to in the school curriculum as the first inhabitants. This study applied base knowledge theory to investigate how teachers’ practice can benefit from using archaeological evidence and theory as an instructional strategy. To this end, we utilized participatory action research methods to involve teachers in the process of exploring activities to test whether teachers could apply these topics and strategies to their own classroom setting. Finally, this paper contributes to a growing field of research in Archaeology Education, in which educators are partners with researchers in transferring archaeological knowledge to learning situations.This article presents the results of a case study in the Dominican Republic on the educational applications of seascapes as content for teaching about the indigenous peoples, the Amerindians, also referred to in the school curriculum as the first inhabitants. This study applied base knowledge theory to investigate how teachers’ practice can benefit from using archaeological evidence and theory as an instructional strategy. To this end, we utilized participatory action research methods to involve teachers in the process of exploring activities to test whether teachers could apply these topics and strategies to their own classroom setting. Finally, this paper contributes to a growing field of research in Archaeology Education, in which educators are partners with researchers in transferring archaeological knowledge to learning situations.This article presents the results of a case study in the Dominican Republic on the educational applications of seascapes as content for teaching about the indigenous peoples, the Amerindians, also referred to in the school curriculum as the first inhabitants. This study applied base knowledge theory to investigate how teachers’ practice can benefit from using archaeological evidence and theory as an instructional strategy. To this end, we utilized participatory action research methods to involve teachers in the process of exploring activities to test whether teachers could apply these topics and strategies to their own classroom setting. Finally, this paper contributes to a growing field of research in Archaeology Education, in which educators are partners with researchers in transferring archaeological knowledge to learning situations.

To read the full article, click the link.

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