Universiteit Leiden

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Monika Baar

Professor by special appointment of Central European Studies

Name
Prof.dr. M.K. Baar
Telephone
+31 71 527 8980
E-mail
m.k.baar@hum.leidenuniv.nl

Monika Baár holds a doctorate in Modern History from the University of Oxford (2002) and subsequently held a two-year Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin and a two-year Teaching Fellowship at the University of Essex. She also held fellowships at the Centro Incontri Umani, Ascona (Switzerland), the Free University Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study in Edinburgh, Collegium Budapest and the National Humanities Centre, Canberra. Before joining the Institute for History at Leiden University in 2015 she was Rosalind Franklin Fellow at the University of Groningen between 2009 and 2015. In June 2017 she was appointed as the holder of the Special Chair for Central European Studies at the Leiden University Institute for History.

More information about Monika Baar

Fields of interest

Historiography, cultural history and the history of political thought since the eighteenth century to the present, with special attention to Central and Eastern Europe and to the trajectories of small cultures; comparative and transnational history 

Marginality, inequality and vulnerability as theoretical and as empirical problems

Disability studies (including both social policy and the grassroots movements of disabled citizens), conceptualizations of disability in ‘Western’ and ‘non-Western’ cultures, human rights discourses, knowledge transfer between international organizations, medical humanities, history of the senses 

History of the human-animal-machine nexus, posthumanism, the history of animals with special attention to the history of guide dogs for the blind

Research

  1. My interest in comparative historiography resulted in the book Historians and Nationalism: East-Central Europe in the Nineteenth Century, which was published by Oxford University Press in 2010. Between 2008 and 2013 I was core member in the ERC-funded collaborative research project ‘Negotiating Modernity: the History of Political Thought in East-Central Europe’. A two-volume book emerging from this project is forthcoming from Oxford University Press. Its main innovation is that it seeks to contribute to the emergence of a truly European perspective of intellectual history by breaking the essentialist duality of Western ‘core’ and Eastern ‘periphery’. 
  2. Rethinking Disability: the Impact of the International Year of Disabled Persons (1981) in Global Perspective –this project is funded by an ERC Consolidator Grant and studies the far-reaching political, societal and cultural implications of an event that has been entirely overlooked in mainstream history. It aims to think afresh about disability by examining the meanings people in various parts of the world assign to the concept. 
  3. Human/Animal Studies: The History of Guide Dogs for the Blind (supported by a Wellcome Trust Medical Humanities Small Grant). This project traces the history of the guide dogs for the blind (in the USA also known as seeing-eye dogs) and also reflects on their status in contemporary society. Its theoretical contribution addresses the very special human-animal partnership which exists between guide dogs and their owners; one which is based on mutual trust and represents the highest degree of cooperation known between animal and man. The project argues that the establishment of professional guide dog training in Germany in 1916, in response to the mobility needs of blinded veterans, placed the human-animal bond onto a new ground. Following their success in Germany, guide dogs were introduced in numerous other countries in Europe, North America and more recently in other countries and regions (for example in South Africa, Israel, Japan, China). This often required significant changes to the original idea. Rather than focusing on the guide dogs in a narrow perspective, the research uses their ‘story’ as a highly unusual vantage point, through which new insights can be gained into disciplines that are rarely studied together: the history of the animal-human bond, disability studies, history of philanthropy, history of animal science, history of emotions, media studies and robotics. The first outcome of this project was published in the journal First World War Studies: www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19475020.2015.1047890

Teaching activities

My teaching repertoire includes a broad spectrum of courses in cultural, political and social history as well as on research methodology. Before joining Leiden University, I taught courses at King’s College in London, Essex University, Free University Berlin and Groningen University. I developed special subjects on the history of East-Central Europe and on the history of animals. At the University of Groningen I taught on the University’s excellence program, the Honours College and I was founding member of the University College, where I contributed to the Exploring Humanities module of the BA/BSc degree in Liberal Arts& Sciences. 
In 2014 I was involved in an Erasmus collaboration with the Osteuropa Institut, Freie Universität, Berlin, on the course Sommer in Sozialismus: Ost-West Kontakte im Kontext von Diktatur, Dissens und Alltag, which also included a study trip to Prague, Budapest, the Lake Balaton, Sopron and Vienna. 

I am member of the Education Programme Committee of the Huizinga Institute (Research Institute and Graduate School for Cultural History, Amsterdam) and I organized the Huizinga Institute’s Summer School in 2015: Legacies of Johan Huizinga: Cultural History, Material Culture and Biography. 

In 2014 I was recipient of the 3rd European Award for Excellence in Teaching in the Social Sciences and Humanities and the accompanying Diener Prize, which was awarded by the Center for Teaching and Learning of the Central European University, Budapest.

Curriculum vitae

I completed my undergraduate studies in History, Literature and Linguistics at Eötvös Loránd University (ELTE) in Budapest and received MA degrees in History from the Central European University, Budapest and from the School of Slavonic and East European Studies, London. During my undergraduate years I spent one semester at the University of Vilnius with a Peregrinatio scholarship of ELTE and another one with the scholarship of Aktion Österreich-Ungarn at the University of Vienna. I was awarded my doctorate in Modern History by the University of Oxford in 2002 and subsequently held a two-year Postdoctoral Fellowship at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in Berlin and a two-year Teaching Fellowship at the University of Essex. I also held fellowships at the Centro Incontri Umani, Ascona (Switzerland), the Free University Berlin, Institute for Advanced Study in Edinburgh, Collegium Budapest and the National Humanities Centre, Canberra. Before joining the Institute for History in Leiden I was Rosalind Franklin Fellow at the University of Groningen between 2009 and 2015.

Key publications

Books

Historians and Nationalism: East-Central Europe in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford Historical Monographs, Oxford University Press, 2010, 352 pages, paperback edition in 2013 www.oup.com/uk/catalogue/?ci=9780199581184
available also on Oxford Scholarship Online: www.oxfordscholarship.com

Co-authored book

B. Trencsényi, M. Janowski, M. Baár, M. Falina, M. Kopeček, ‘A History of Political Thought in East-Central Europe’, two-volume book of 600 000 words, 

Articles and book chapters

‘Prosthesis for the Body and for the Soul: the Origins of Guide Dog Provision in Interwar Germany’, First World War Studies, special issue on Commemorating the Disabled Soldier, Vol. 6:1 (2015), 81-98. 
Free access: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/19475020.2015.1047890#abstract

‘Disability and Civil Courage under State Socialism: the Scandal about the Hungarian Guide Dog School’, Past and Present in 227:1 (May, 2015), 179-203. 

‘Echoes of the Social Contract in Central and Eastern Europe, 1770-1825’, in Avi Lifschitz (ed.), Engaging with Rousseau: Reception and Interpretations from the Eighteenth Century to the Present, Cambridge University Press, forthcoming in summer, 2016. 

‘‘The European Disability ‘Revolts’ of 1980/81: How Were They Related to the Youth Revolts?’’, in Knud Andersen and Bart van der Steen (eds.), A European Youth Revolt in 1980/81?, forthcoming in January 2016 from Palgrave Macmillan. 

Survey article on ‘history writing’, Encyclopaedia of Romantic Nationalism in Europe (editor Joep Leerssen):  http://romanticnationalism.net
Printed version forthcoming from Amsterdam University Press in 2016. 

‘Academic Competitions in National History’, in Ilaria Porciani and Jo Tollebeek (eds.) Writing the Nation. Vol. II. Institutions, Networks and Communities of National History: Comparative Approaches, Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, pp. 165-182. 

‘Heretics into National Heroes: Jules Michelet’s Joan of Arc and František Palacký’s John Hus’, in Stefan Berger and Chris Lorenz (eds.) Nationalizing the Past. Historians as Nationbuilders in Modern Europe, Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, pp. 128-148. 

‘East-Central European Historical Writing’, Chapter 19 in Volume 4, The Oxford History of Historical Writing (general editor Daniel Woolf), Oxford University Press, 2011, pp. 326-348. 

‘Abraham Viskaski, the Patriarch of the Ruritanian Nation’. Wie es eigentlich nicht gewesen’, Storia della Storiografia/History of Historiography 54 (2008), pp. 3-20.

Professor by special appointment of Central European Studies

  • Faculty of Humanities
  • Institute for History
  • Algemene Geschiedenis

Work address

Johan Huizinga
Doelensteeg 16
2311 VL Leiden
Room number 2.03b

Contact

Senior University Lecturer

  • Faculty of Humanities
  • Institute for History
  • Algemene Geschiedenis

Work address

Johan Huizinga
Doelensteeg 16
2311 VL Leiden
Room number 2.03b

Contact

  • Baar M.K. & Trigt P.W. van (2019), Introduction. In: Baar M.K., Trigt P.W. van (Eds.) Marginalized Groups, Inequalities and the Post-War Welfare State: Whose Welfare?. Londen: Routledge. 1-8.book chapter
  • Baar M.K. (2019), Rethinking the Cold War through the Lens of Disability.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Disabled Refugees and Disabling Displacement: International Norms and Local Realities.conference paper
  • Trigt P.W. van & Baar M.K. (2019), British and European Citizenship: Entanglements through the Lens of Disability, Contemporary European History 28: 50-52.article in journal
  • Baar M.K. & Trigt P.W. van (2019), British and European Citizenship: Entanglements through the Lens of Disability, Journal of Contemporary History 28(1): 50-52.article in journal
  • Derksen A. & Baar M.K. (2019), Das Internationale Jahr der Behinderten 1981 in historischer Perspektive. In: Miquel M. van, Degener T. (Eds.) Behindertenpolitik und Behindertenrecht seit den 1970er Jahren.: Transcript Verlag. 161-184.book chapter
  • Baar M.K. (2019), Of Communism, Compromise and Central Europe: the Scholarly Persona under Authoritarianism. In: Paul H.J. (Ed.) How to be a Historian: Scholarly Personae in Historical Studies 1800-2000.: Manchester University Press, 2019. 164-181.book chapter
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Studium Generale lecture, Leiden University: How did disability become a global concern?conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Community-Building for People with Disabilities.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Writing Global Histories of Disability: The Place of the Asian Continent.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), The Value of Disabled Children in Asia.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Reclaiming the Notion of Resilience in Neoliberal Times.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Retrieving the Voices of Persons with Disabilities.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Writing Disability into the History of International Organizations.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Integration of Disability into Humanitarian Action: Opportunities and Challenges.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2018), History of Rehabilitation and its Place within the Study of Global Health.conference paper
  • Trigt P.W. van & Baar M.K. (2018), 1974. Dennedal: een progressief experiment?. In: Heerma van Voss L, Hart M. 't, Davids K, Fatah-Black K, Lucassen L, Touwen J. (Eds.) Wereldgeschiedenis van Nederland.. 665-670.book chapter
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Advisory Board Member of the research project funded by the Bulgarian Research Foundation: Generational Patterns of Coping with Life Crisis: Biographical, Social and Institutional Discourses (project leader Dr. Ina Dimitrova, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences). [other].other
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Advisory Board Member, Public Disability History blog journal. [other].other
  • Trencsényi B., Kopeček M., Falina M., Lisjak L., Baár M.K. & Janowski M. (2018), A History of Political Thought in East-Central Europe: Oxford University Press.book
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Editorial board member, Nationalisms Across the Globe series, Peter Lang publishers. [other].other
  • Baar M.K. (2018), Singing and painting global awareness: international years and human rights at the United Nations. In: Brendebach J., Herzer M., Tworek H. (Eds.) International Organizations and the media in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Exorbitant Expectations. Routledge studies in modern history: Routledge. 182-203.book chapter
  • Baar M.K. (2017), 12 April, Radio interview on the political situation in Hungary for Science 07 (Leiden) [interview].radio interview
  • Baar M.K. (2017), 12 November, 2017, Discussion leader/panelist, Hungarian Salon, Goethe Institute Amsterdam, on Hungarian refugees in the Netherlands after the 1956 Revolution. [other].other
  • Baar M.K. (2017), 2-7 April, 2017 Intersections: 24th Annual Conference of EUROCLIO (European Association of History Teachers), San Sebastian, 2017, discussion group leader: Teaching the History of Groups with Vulnerabilities, subsequently holding training sessions on disability studies in the Hague. [other].other
  • Baar M.K. (2017), 28-30 November, 2017 selected participant of the European Parliament’s Member of Parliament (MEP)-Scientist pairing scheme, visit and lecture in the European Parliament, Brussels. [other].other
  • Baar M.K. (2017), 30 September 2017, contributor to the Multi-stakeholder Workshop, Palace of Nations, Geneva, IASC Guidelines on Inclusion of Persons with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action. [other].other
  • Baar M.K. (2017), Advisory Board Member, Dutch Network Sources of Inclusive Citizenship. [other].other
  • Baar M.K. (2017), Associate Editor, journal Nationalities Papers. [other].other
  • Baar M.K. (2017), Review of: Paul van Trigt (2013) Blind in een Gidsland, Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis 130(1): 147-48.book review
  • Baar M.K. (2017), Review of: Phillipus Breuker (2014) Opkomst en bloei van het Friese nationalisme, 1740-1875, BMGN: Low Countries Historical Review 132.book review
  • Baar M.K. (2017), Competing Missionaries, Clashing Ideologies in Latin America during the Cold War: the Birth of Liberation Psychology in El Salvador.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2017), De-pathologizing Disability: Politics, Culture and Identity, Neue Politische Literatur .article in journal
  • Baar M.K. (2017), Discussant of the panel: the First World War, its Aftermath, and Nationalism in Central Europe.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2017), Kennisclip (short video) on the history of mental illness during the Cold War in the framework of the Hacking the Textbook project supported by an Onderwijsinnovatie grant by the Faculty of Humanities (Documentary). [film].other
  • Baar M.K. (2017), The Inner Emigration of Historians under Authoritarian Regimes.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2017), The Resonance of Health for All and the Alma Ata Declaration (1979) in Cold War Europe and Beyond.conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2017), The UN’s International Year: A Paradigm Change?conference paper
  • Baar M.K. (2016), Review of: Górny M. (2013) The Nation Should Come First: Marxism and Historiography in East Central Europe, American Historical Review 121(1): 327-328.book review
  • Baar M.K. (2016), Disability and the Cultural Meaning of Signatures. Public Disability History. Kiel, Germany: Public Disability History [blog entry].other
  • Baar M.K. (2016), Echoes of the Social Contract in Central and Eastern Europe, 1770-1825. In: Lifschitz A. (Ed.) Engaging with Rousseau: Reception and Interpretations from the Eighteenth Century to the Present.: Cambridge University Press. 95-113.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2016), ‘From Working Animals to Cherished Pets: the History of the Domestic Dog’, special issue on the human-animal relationship, Groniek. Historisch Tijdschrift 206/207(48): 47-59.article in journal
  • Trencsényi B., Janowski M., Baár M.K., Falina M. & Kopeček M. (2016), Negotiating Modernity in the ‘Long Nineteenth Century' no. I: Oxford University Press.book
  • Baar M.K. (2016), The European Disability 'Revolts' of 1980/81: How Were They Related to the Youth Revolts?. In: Andersen K., Steen B. van der (Eds.) A European Youth Revolt in 1980/81?.: Palgrave Macmillan. 159-171.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2015), Disability and Civil Courage under State Socialism: the Scandal about the Hungarian Guide Dog School, Past and Present: a journal of scientific history 227(1): 179-203.article in journal
  • Baár M.K. (2015), Informal Networks, International Developments and the Politicization of Disabled People in Hungary in 1981, 53(Special Issue: Disability Movements: National Policies and Transnational Perspectives): 39-62.article in journal
  • Baár M.K. (2015), Prosthesis for the Body and for the Soul: the Origins of Guide Dog Provision in Interwar Germany, First World War Studies 6(1): 81-98.article in journal
  • Baár M.K. (2013), ‘Geschiedenis van de blindengeleidehond’ (Guide Dogs for the Blind: A History), Geschiedenis Magazine (July-August): 33.article in journal
  • Baár M.K. (2012), Academic Competitions in National History. In: Porciani I., Tollebeek J. (Eds.) Institutions, Networks and Communities of National History: Comparative Approaches. no. II: Palgrave Macmillan. 165-182.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2012), Contribution to book panel on Steven Seegel’s Mapping Europe’s Borderlands, Chicago University Press, 2012, text published in Nationalities Papers, 42:2, 2014, pp. 5-6. [other]other
  • Baár M.K. (2012), ‘Németország születése: területi követelések és történetírói szerepek’ (‘The Birth of Germany: Territorial Demands and Historians’ Roles’). In: Frank T. (Ed.) Németföldről Németországba (From the German Lands to Germany). Budapest. 132-150.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2011), East-Central European Historical Writing. In: Woolf D. (Ed.) The Oxford History of Historical Writing. no. 4: Oxford University Press. 326-348.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2011), Heretics into National Heroes: Jules Michelet’s Joan of Arc and František Palacký’s John Hus. In: Berger S., Lorenz C. (Eds.) Nationalizing the Past. Historians as Nationbuilders in Modern Europe.: Palgrave Macmillan. 128-148.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2011), National Antiquities in East-Central Europe: Three Variations on a Leading Theme. In: Klaniczay G., Werner M. (Eds.) Multiple Antiquities –Multiple Modernities. Ancient History in Nineteenth Century European Cultures. Frankfurt & New York: Campus Verlag. 163-184.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2010), From General History to National History: the Transformation of William Guthrie’s and John Gray’s General History of the World in Continental Europe. In: Stockhorst S. (Ed.) Cultural Transfer through Translation. The Circulation of Enlightened Thought in Europe by Means of Translation. Amsterdam: Rodopi. 63-83.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2010), Historians and Nationalism: East-Central Europe in the Nineteenth Century. Oxford: Oxford University Press.book
  • Baár M.K. (2010), ‘Kis népek a nagyhatalmak árnyékában: Kažys Pakstas és a litván függetlenség’ (Small Nations in the Shadow of Great Powers: Kažys Pakstas and Lithuania’s Independence’). In: Berkes T. (Ed.) Borostyánút (The Amber Road). Budapest. 62-70.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2008), Abraham Viskaski, the Patriarch of the Ruritanian Nation’. Wie es eigentlich nicht gewesen, Storia della Storiografia 54: 3-20.article in journal
  • Baár M.K. (2008), Sguardi a confronto: il 1848 nelle memorie storiografiche ungherese e ceca. In: Petrungaro S. (Ed.) Fratelli di chi. Liberte, uguaglianza e guerra nel Quarantotto asburgico. Venice: Editione Spartaco. 140-155.book chapter
  • Baár M.K. (2007), Grenzen in nationalen Historiographien. In: Duhamelle Ch., Kossert A., Struck B. (Eds.) Grenzregionen. Ein europäischer Vergleich vom 18. bis zum 20. Jahrhundert. Frankfurt: Campus Verlag. 77-98.book chapter
  • Baár M. & Deciu-Ritivoi A. (2006), The Transylvanian Babel: Negotiating National Identity through Language in a Disputed Territory, 26(3-4): 203-217.article in journal
  • Baár M.K. (2001), The Intellectual Horizons of Liberal Nationalism in Hungary: The Case of Mihály Horváth (1809-1878). In: Trencsényi B. et alii (Ed.) Nation-Building and Contested Identities. Romanian & Hungarian Case Studies.: Regio Books-Budapest, Editura-Polirom, Iaşi. 21-42.book chapter
  • Nationalities Papers Associate Editor

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