Universiteit Leiden

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Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg

Professor of Neurobiological and Environmental Determinants of Parenting and Child Development

Name
Prof.dr. M.J. Bakermans-Kranenburg
Telephone
+31 71 527 2727
E-mail
bakermans@fsw.leidenuniv.nl

Academic Career

  • Professor, Centre for Child and Family Studies, Leiden University (2007-present)
  • Professor, Rommert Casimir Research Institute, Leiden University (2007-present)
  • Associate professor (UHD), Centre for Child and Family Studies and Data Theory, Leiden University (2004-2007)
  • Assistant professor (UD), Centre for Child and Family Studies and Data Theory, Leiden University (1993-2004)
  • PhD. Social Sciences, Leiden University. 'The Adult Attachment Interview: Psychometric analyses' (October 1993)
  • MA. Education, Centre for Child and Family Studies and Data Theory, Leiden University. Subject: Attachment and maternal structuring (March 1989)

Academic honours and awards

  • Honorary Doctorate, University of Lund, Sweden, June 2, 2017


     
  • Highly Cited Researcher in Psychology/Psychiatry 2016 (Thomson Reuters)
  • Advanced grant from the European Research Council 2015.
  • Elected member of the KNAW ( Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences) since 2012.
  • Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science since 2012
  • NWO - VICI laureate 2009/2010. Grant for outstanding senior researchers who have shown that they have the ability successfully to develop their own innovative lines of research and to act as coaches for young researchers
  • Bowlby-Ainsworth Award 2005 ( New York Attachment Consortium & The Center for Mental Health Promotion). The Bowlby-Ainsworth Award recognizes founders and singular contributors to the Bowlby-Ainsworth tradition of attachment theory and research. April 2005.
  • NWO - VIDI laureate 2004. Grant for outstanding young researchers who are among the top 10-20% of their peer group
  • ISED-SCHEIDEGGER award for best PhD related paper (in Developmental Psychology, 1993)
  • Dissertation Award of the Society for Emotion and Attachment Studies for PhD student Madelon Riem (2013). Title of dissertation: “Toward a neuroscience of parenting. Adult attachment and oxytocin affect neural and behavioral responses to infant attachment signals”
  • Award for the best scientific article published in an international journal, awarded by the Institute for the Study of Education and Human Development (ISED): Out, D., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2011). Physiological reactivity to infant crying.  Genes, Brain & Behavior, 9, 868-876.
  • American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children’s Best Article in Child Maltreatment Award 2011 (with Stoltenborgh, Euser, and Van IJzendoorn: “A global perspective on child sexual abuse: meta-analysis of prevelance around the world”) awarded at the APSAC conference in Chicago on June 29th 2012.
  • Award for the best international article of the Institute of Education and Child Studies, Leiden University to PhD student Madelon Riem. Riem, Bakermans-Kranenburg, Pieper, Tops, Boksem, Vermeiren, Van IJzendoorn, Rombouts, (2011). Oxytocin modulates amygdala, insula and inferior frontal gyrus responses to infant crying: A randomized control trial.  Biological Psychiatry, 70, 291-297.
  • Award for best dissertation 2009-2011 PhD student D. Out. Title of dissertation: “Parenting unraveled: predictors of infant attachment and responses to crying.” Institute of Education and Child Studies, Leiden University.
  • American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children’s Outstanding Research Article Award 2010 (with Cyr, Van IJzendoorn, and Euser: “Attachment security and disorganization in maltreating and high-risk families: A series of meta-analyses”) awarded at the APSAC conference in Philadelphia on July 15th 2011.
  • Best Article Award ISED 2007. For: “ Social Development from Infancy to Adolescence: Longitudinal and Concurrent Factors in an Adoption Sample”. Developmental Psychology, 42, 1143-1153 (with Jaffar-Bimmel, Juffer, Van IJzendoorn, &, Mooijaart).

Grants

  • ERC Advanced grant
    I was awarded the Advanced grant from the European Research Council in 2015. This is the highest European scientific recognition. (2.500.000 euro). 
  • GRAVITY 
    PI in the research group that received the GRAVITY grant (2012) from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO) (700.000 euro).
  • VICI 
    In 2010 I was awarded the VICI grant (1.500.000 euro) from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The grant enabled me to appoint a Postdoc and five PhD students for a period of five years.
  • VIDI 
    In 2004 I was awarded the VIDI grant (600.000 euro) from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). The grant enabled me to appoint a Postdoc, a PhD student, and student assistants for a period of five years.

Other external grants

  • NWO (Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research, 2008):  Neurobiological and parental determinants of emergent morality in three year old children Applicants: M.H. van IJzendoorn, F.C. Verhulst, M.J. Bakermans-Kranenburg, & H. Tiemeier. (k€220)
  • NWO (2004): “ Prerequisites for the development of attachment and reversibility of disorganized and atypical patterns of attachment: An adoption study.” Applicants: F. Juffer, M.H. van IJzendoorn, & M.J. Bakermans-Kranenburg. (k€180)
  • NWO (1996): "The development of empathy and compliance in toddlers: The role of parenting, attachment, and temperament." Applicants: M.H. van IJzendoorn, & M.J. Bakermans-Kranenburg. (kfl 200)

Internal PhD grants

  • Father Trials: Prenatal video-feedback with fathers. Applicant: Bakermans-Kranenburg (2016). k€220
  • Unraveling the mechanisms underlying VIPP effects on positive parenting. Applicant: Bakermans-Kranenburg (2016). k€220
  • “Intergenerational transmission of emotion regulation”. Applicant: Bakermans-Kranenburg (2014). k€220
  • “Gene-environment interactions over time”. Applicant: Bakermans-Kranenburg (2011). k€220
  • “Parenting is stressful: A fMRI study of responses to crying”.  Applicant: Bakermans-Kranenburg (2008). k€220
  • “Predictors of harsh parenting in early childhood”. Applicants: Van IJzendoorn, Mesman, & Bakermans-Kranenburg (2006). k€200
  •  “ Prerequisites for the development of attachment and reversibility of disorganized and atypical patterns of attachment: An adoption study”. Applicants: Van IJzendoorn, Juffer, & Bakermans-Kranenburg (2004).
  •  “ Breaking the circle of insecurity: An intervention with insecure mothers”. Applicants: Van IJzendoorn, Juffer, & Bakermans-Kranenburg (2002). k€180
  • Attachment and Coherence: Validation of the Coherence Q-Sort”. Applicants: Bakermans-Kranenburg & Van IJzendoorn (2001) k€180
  • Contributions of attachment, temperament, and parenting to development of empathic concern: The Leiden Longitudinal Study”. Applicants: Van IJzendoorn & Bakermans-Kranenburg (2001). k€180
  • Attachment and Coherence: Validation of the Coherence Q-Sort”. Applicants: Van IJzendoorn & Bakermans-Kranenburg (2001). k€180
  •  “ Attachment in young children at high-risk for autism”. Applicants: Bakermans-Kranenburg, Van IJzendoorn, Van Berckelaer-Onnes, Willemsen-Swinkels, & Buitelaar (2000).
  •  “ Twins and Attachment”. Applicants: Van IJzendoorn & Bakermans-Kranenburg (1998).

Main research interests

My research focus is attachment and emotion regulation in parents and their children, with special emphasis on neurobiological processes in parenting and development. My academic interests include the interplay between nature and nurture, exploring and testing the ‘differential susceptibility’ model, hormonal correlates of parenting, and interventions. The studies I am involved in are embedded in the research programme PEARL (Program for Emotion and Attachment Research Leiden) of the Centre for Child and Family Studies.
 

Differential Susceptibility: The Interplay between Nature and Nurture

Our lab was the first to discover and document (in 2006) genetic differential susceptibility of children to their rearing environment. We experimentally demonstrated that carriers of the Dopamine D4 receptor 7-repeat (DRD4-7R) allele were not only most vulnerable to adverse parental influences but also showed the most positive outcomes when they received supportive care. DRD4-7R has long been considered a ‘risk’ gene related to increased risks for, e.g., ADHD and addiction, but our correlational and experimental molecular genetic studies (in recent studies broadened to gene sets) showed that dopamine related genes may also be considered as genetic markers of differential susceptibility or biological plasticity to environmental influences. This discovery triggered numerous studies on genetic differential susceptibility, and by now has found strong meta-analytical support. We also tested the role of the serotonin transporter gene as susceptibility factor, and found in a meta-analyses empirical support for this idea, at least in Caucasian samples. Perhaps most importantly, we paved the way for a completely new approach to Gene X Environment research, going beyond correlational studies to experimental  tests of GxE with much improved statistical power. 

central papers:

  • Mileva-Seitz, V.R., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2016). Genetic mechanisms of parenting. Hormones and Behavior, 77, 211-223. DOI:10.1016/j.yhbeh.2015.06.003.
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2015). The hidden efficacy of interventions: Gene x Environment experiments from a differential susceptibility perspective. Annual Review of Psychology, 66, 381-409. DOI:10.1146/annurev-psych-010814-015407
  • Windhorst, D.A., Mileva-Seitz, V.R., Linting, M., Hofman, A., Jaddoe, V.W.V., Verhulst, F.C., … Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2015). Differential Susceptibility in a Developmental Perspective: DRD4 and Maternal Sensitivity Predicting Externalizing Behavior. Developmental Psychobiology, 57(1), 35-49.
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Mesman, J., Alink, L.R.A., & Juffer, F. (2008). Effects of an attachment-based intervention on daily cortisol moderated by DRD4: A randomized control trial on 1-3-year-olds screened for externalizing behavior. Development & Psychopathology, 20, 805-820. DOI: 10.1017/S0954579408000382
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2006). Gene-environment interaction of the Dopamine D4 receptor (DRD4) and observed maternal insensitivity predicting externalizing behavior in preschoolers. Developmental Psychobiology, 48, 406-409.DOI: 10.1002/dev.20152

Hormonal Correlates of Parenting

An intriguing and relatively recent part of parenting science is related to the hormonal correlates of parenting. We studied associations between basal levels of oxytocin and various aspects of parenting, and we conducted a series of experimental studies on the behavioral and neural effects of intranasally administered oxytocin. Addressing doubts about whether intranasally administered oxytocin actually enters the human brain, our lab was the first to show that oxytocin changes resting state functional connectivity between the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC) and the brainstem, and between the PCC, the cerebellum, and the postcentral gyrus, areas in the brain involved in self-referential processes and understanding others’ mental states. Moreover, we showed in the first randomized trial of its type that fathers become more sensitive in playful interactions with their toddler after intranasal administration of oxytocin. Following this line of research on the neurobiology of parenting, we examined the underlying mechanisms of adults’ intended caregiving responses to cry sounds in an experimental design with adult twins. We found that experimentally manipulated oxytocin levels decreased amygdala activity in response to infant cry sounds, and increased activation in the insula and inferior frontal gyrus pars triangularis, thus reducing activation in the neural circuitry for anxiety and aversion, and increasing activation in regions involved in empathy. Moreover, oxytocin seems to increase the reward value of infant laughter. The effects of oxytocin administration may however be moderated by early childhood experiences (Translational Psychiatry, 2013). In concert with other hormones and neurotransmitters, oxytocin might play a key role in sensitive parenting and the development of attachment.

In a recently started project funded by an ERC Advanced Grant we focus on the hormonal, neural, and behavioral dynamics of fathering through hormonal and behavioral experimental interventions. The aim of the project is to test the hypothesis that fathers’ parenting can be changed by behavioral interventions and that hormonal processes mediate this change – a rather bold hypothesis. Parenting intervention studies hardly ever examine the effects of interventions on parents’ hormonal levels. We hope to bridge this gap with a series of randomized controlled trials (RCT) focusing on a critical phase of parenthood: the transition to having the first baby. Drawing firm conclusions about the neural and hormonal basis of human parenting is critically dependent on RCTs, and we will conduct two types of experiments: (1) within-subject trials, using nasal administration of oxytocin, vasopressin, and a placebo, and (2) between-subject trials, using behavioral interventions aimed at promoting sensitive parenting and physical contact, and examining changes in hormonal levels as potential mechanism. Testing the efficacy of the behavioral experiments in boosting fathers’ protective parenting and participation in caregiving activities will contribute to the practice and support of fathering, with potentially crucial significance for fathers, mothers, children, and society. Examining the hormonal and neural mechanisms is also essential for the development of theory on the interplay between neuroscience and parenting.

central papers:

  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2017). Protective Parenting: Neurobiological and behavioral dimensions. Current Opinion in Psychology, 15, 45-49. DOI: 10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.02.001
  • Feldman, R. & Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2017). Oxytocin: a parenting hormone. Current Opinion in Psychology  15:13–18
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., (2013). Sniffing around oxytocin: review and meta-analyses of trials in healthy and clinical groups with implications for pharmacotherapy. Translational Psychiatry, 3 e258. DOI:10.1038/tp.2013.34
  • Riem, M.M.E., Voorthuis, A., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2014). Pity or peanuts? Oxytocin induces different neural responses to the same infant crying labeled as sick or bored. Developmental Science, 17, 248-256. DOI: 10.1111/desc12103.
  • Riem, M.M.E, Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Tops, M., Boksem, M.A.S., Rombouts S.A.R.B., & Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2012). No laughing matter: Intranasal oxytocin administration changes functional brain connectivity during exposure to infant laughter. Neuropsychopharmacology, 37, 1257–1266. DOI:10.1038/npp.2011.313
  • Naber, F.B.A., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., Deschamps, P., Van Engeland, H., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2010). Intranasal oxytocin increases fathers' observed responsiveness during play with their children: a double-blind within-subject experiment. Psychoneuroendocrinology, 35, 1583-1586. DOI: 10.1016/j.psyneuen.2010.04.007

Interventions

Intervention studies, changing the environment for the better, have their natural place in my line of research. In our Leiden lab, we developed and validated (through randomized control trials) a parent intervention program using video-feedback, the Video-feedback Intervention to promote Positive Parenting and Sensitive Discipline (VIPP-SD; ). In an imaginative and unorthodox way the program crosses borders of two theoretical schools of thought and combines ideas from attachment theory and social learning theory. In a meta-analysis we showed that interaction-focused, brief interventions are more effective in enhancing sensitive parenting than broad-band interventions. Another important finding was that interventions with stronger effects on parental sensitivity were also more effective in enhancing child attachment security, thus providing the first definite evidence for a causal role of parental sensitivity in shaping child attachment. The VIPP-SD program has been successfully implemented in randomized control trials by independent teams in a variety of clinical and at-risk populations across several countries (USA, UK, Canada, Lithuania, Italy, Portugal), with specific adaptations for use in immigrant families, families with a child with Autistic Spectrum Disorder, and children in day care settings. A recent meta-analysis showed that across all RCTs (overall N = 1,116) the intervention program makes half a standard deviation difference between the quality of experimental and control parents’ interactive behavior to the child, and reduces child insecure attachment and problem behavior. 

central book and papers:

  • Juffer, F., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2017). Pairing attachment theory and social learning theory in video-feedback intervention to promote positive parenting. Current Opinion in Psychology, 15, 189-194. DOI: 10.1016/j.copsyc.2017.03.012
  • Kok, R., Thijssen, S., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Jaddoe, V.W.V., Verhulst, F.C., White, T., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., & Tiemeier, H. (2015). Normal variation in early parental sensitivity predicts child structural brain development. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 54, 824-831. DOI: 10.1016/j.jaac.2015.07.009
  • Juffer, F., Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. & Van IJzendoorn, M.H. (2008). Promoting positive parenting: An attachment-based intervention. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J., Van IJzendoorn, M.H., & Juffer, F. (2003). Less is more: Meta-analyses of sensitivity and attachment interventions in early childhood. Psychological Bulletin, 129, 195-215. DOI: 10.1037/0033-2909.129.2.195

International activities

Major international collaboration, resulting in co-publications, with

  • Pasco Fearon - University College London, on intergenerational transmission of attachment; twin studies of attachment; meta-analyses of attachment
  • Jay Belsky - University of California at Davis, on differential susceptibility and gene-environment interaction
  • Glenn Roisman - University of Minnesota, on intergenerational transmission of attachment; meta-analyses of attachment; chapter for Handbook of Developmental Psychopathology (Editor Dante Cicchetti)
  • Paul Ramchandani - Imperial College London, on susceptibility to the effects of fathers’ parenting
  • Alan Stein and Morten Kringelbach- Oxford University, on the neurobiology of parenting and early childhood intervention
  • Howard Steele and Miriam Steele - New School for Social Research, New York, on attachment in institutionalized and adopted children
  • Avi Sagi-Schwartz - University of Haifa, Israel, on the intergenerational transmission of attachment and trauma stress regulation in Holocaust survivors
  • Kim Bard - University of Portsmouth, on development of human-reared chimpanzees in standard and enriched environments
  • Yair Bar-Haim - Tel Aviv University, on attentional bias toward threat and experimental evidence for genetic differential susceptibility
  • Dave Pederson and Greg Moran - University of Western Ontario, on the transmission gap in disorganized attachment
  • Chantal Cyr - University of Quebec, Montreal, on anomalous parenting behavior and on attachment in maltreated infants and toddlers
  • Karine Verschueren - Catholic University of Leuven, Belgium, on parental sensitivity and discipline
  • Nathan Fox - University of Maryland, Charley Zeanah - Tulane University Health Sciences Center, Charles Nelson - Harvard Medical School, and Megan Gunnar - University of Minnesota, on stress regulation in institutionalized children; EEG mu rhythm nt-->
  • Douglas Granger - Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, on stress and alpha amylase
  • Robert Philibert - University of Iowa, and Steven Beach - University of Georgia at Athens, on gene-environment interaction in adoptees; methylation of the serotonin transporter gene
  • Richard Ebstein - Hebrew University, Jerusalem; National University of Singapore, on methylation

Selected invited lectures

  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2017). For Better and for Worse: Differential susceptibility to the environment. Key note, Psychological Conference, Gdansk (September 22).
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2017). Family Matters. Key note, Annual meeting of the SCP, Puerto Natales (March 31)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2017). From Generation R to Generation M: Genetics in a collaborative perspective. Seminario Estudio Longitudinal “Generación Magallanes” (March 28)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2016). VIPP as a program to promote sensitive caregiving: Method and differential efficacy of the intervention program. Conference on parenting and attachment, Capital Normal University, Beijing, China (October 7)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2016). The Impact of Abuse and Neglect and Possibilities for Intervention. Invited key note, 15th World Congress of the World Association for Infant Mental Health, Prague (May 29 - June 2).
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2016) Fathers in the picture: sensitivity and beyond. University of Copenhagen (August 26)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2016) Kernel of truth in the indigo myth? Anne Treisman lecture (yearly lecture to highlight exceptional women in psychological science), University of Oxford (June 16)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2015) The impact of attachment security on children’s development and well-being: Opportunities for intervention. Minerva-Gentner-Symposium on The intergenerational transmission of childhood adversity, Heidelberg (April 15)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2014). Sniffing around Oxytocin. Trials with oxytocin administration in healthy and clinical groups. The Bridge Programme, Anna Freud Centre, University College and Yale School of Medicine, London (December 12)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2014). Attachment organization in disordered environments. Jack Tizard memorial lecture and national conference ACAMH, Royal College of Physicians, London (June 13)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2014). Family Matters. Parliament, London (June 11)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2013). Sniffing around Oxytocin: Trials with oxytocin administration in healthy and clinical groups. International Attachment Conference, Pavia, Italy (August 31)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2013). Genetic Differential Susceptibility. Moderation by Genotype and Methylation. EADP Winter School, Leuven, Belgium (January 8)
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2012). Oxytocin and Parenting. British Psychological Society, Glasgow, UK (September 5) 2012
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2011). Oxytocin: The Oxygen of Parenting? International Attachment Conference, Oslo, Norway (August 19).
  • Bakermans-Kranenburg, M.J. (2011). Who benefits from early intervention? The role of genetic, prenatal and temperamental factors in susceptibility to intervention. Emanuel Miller Guest Lecture 2011. London, UK (March 11).

PhD projects

  1. Reijman, Sophie (2015, December 16). Child maltreatment under the skin: basal activity and stress reactivity of the autonomic nervous system and attachment representations in maltreating parents. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. L. R. A. Alink & prof. dr. M. H. van IJzendoorn).
  2. Van der Pol, Lotte D. (2015, November 25). Focus on feelings: Parental emotion socialization in early childhood. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. J. Mesman & dr. M. Groeneveld).
  3. Windhorst, Dafna A. (2015, November 24). Differential susceptibility to parenting: exploring new approaches. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. H. Tiemeier, dr. R. Rippe & dr. V. Mileva-Seitz).
  4. Pappa, Irene (2015, November 20). Genetics and epigenetics of children’s behaviour problems. Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. H. Tiemeier)
  5. Thijssen, Sandra (2015, October 15). Neurobiological correlates of externalizing and prosocial behaviour in school-age children: a study on truths and lies. Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. H. Tiemeier, dr. T. White)
  6. Hallers-Haalboom, Elizabeth T. (2015, October 7). Mothers and fathers: Parenting practices in families with two children. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. J. Mesman & dr. M. Groeneveld).
  7. Endendijk, Joyce. J. (2015, April 21). Heroes and Housewives. The role of gender and gender stereotypes in parenting and child development. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. J. Mesman & dr. M. Groeneveld).
  8. Van Berkel, Sheila (2015, March 10). Growing Up Together. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. J. Mesman & dr. M. Groeneveld).
  9. Mah, Beth (2015, January 7). Postnatal depression, oxytocin and maternal sensitivity. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M. H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. R. Smith).
  10. Van der Voort, Anja (2014, November 20). The importance of sensitive parenting  A longitudinal adoption study on maternal sensitivity, problem behavior, and cortisol secretion. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. F. Juffer & dr M. Linting).
  11. Poslawsky Irina E. (2014, January 9). Parenting a child with autism. Support for early parent-child interaction. Universiteit Utrecht.  (With: prof. dr. H. van Engeland).
  12. Voorthuis, Sandra (2013, December 11). Future parents: Childhood experiences, oxytocin and emotion regulation skills. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M. H. van IJzendoorn).
  13. Bhandari, Ritu (2013, December 18). Perception of infant cues. The role of childhood experiences and oxytocin. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M. H. van IJzendoorn & dr. R. van der Veen).
  14. Euser, Saskia (2013, November 28). Child maltreatment in numbers. A multimethod study of year prevalence rates and risk factors. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. L. R. A. Alink & prof. dr. M. H. van IJzendoorn).
  15. Lucassen, Nicole (2013, October 1). Do fathers matter? A search for causes and consequences of parental sensitivity. Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam.  (With: prof. dr. H. Tiemeier & prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  16. Riem, Madelon (2013, June 4). Toward a neuroscience of parenting. Adult attachment and oxytocin affect neural and behavioral responses to infant attachment signals. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  17. Kok, Rianne (2013, March 21). “Do as I say!”. Parenting and the biology of child self-regulation. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn, prof. dr. H. Tiemeier & prof. dr. F.C. Verhulst).
  18. Joosen, Katharina (2012, November 22). Harsh discipline in toddlerhood: A longitudinal study on maternal physiological and behavioral predictors. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. J. Mesman & prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  19. Stoltenborgh, Marije (2012, June 22). It should not hurt to be a child. Prevalence of child maltreatment across the globe. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & dr. L.R.A. Alink).
  20. Huffmeijer, Renske (2011, December 14). Shaping internal working models: Parental love withdrawal, oxytocin, and asymmetric frontal brain activity affect socio-emotional information processing. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn, dr. L.R.A. Alink, dr. M. Tops).
  21. Tharner, Anne (2011, June 29). Parents and Infants. Determinants of attachment: in a longitudinal population-based study. Erasmus Universiteit Rotterdam.  (With: prof. dr. F.C Verhulst, prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & dr. H. Tiemeier).
  22. Fridman, Ayala (2011, March 2). Surviving early childhood trauma: Effects of the Holocaust on survivors' psychological and physiological well-being. University of Haifa (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. A. Sagi-Schwartz).
  23. Luijk, Maartje (2010, December 9). Infant attachment and stress regulation. A neurobiological study. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn, prof. dr. F.C. Verhulst, dr. H. Tiemeier).
  24. Mbagaya, Catherine (2010, December 1). Child maltreatment in Kenya, Zambia, and The Netherlands. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & dr. P. O. Oburu).
  25. Kalinauskiene, Lina (2010, November 12). The possibilities of intervention in mother-infant attachment relationships [Monitos ir kŭdikio prierašumo santykių korekcijos galimybės]. Vilnius University.  (With: dr. Danguolė Čekuolienė & prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  26. Van den Dries, Linda (2010, Oktober 27). Development after international adoption. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof dr. F. Juffer & prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  27. Out, Dorothée (2010, March 25). Parenting unraveled: Predictors of infant attachment & Responses to crying. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  28. Dobrova-Krol, Natasha (2009, December 9). Vulnerable children in Ukraine: Impact of institutional care and HIV on the development of preschoolers. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. F. Juffer).
  29. Euser, Eveline (2009, November 26). Child Maltreatment: Prevalence and risk factors. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  30. Barel, Efrat (2009, March 5): Consequences of the Holocaust for Survivors: A Meta-Analysis. University of Haifa.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. A. Sagi-Schwartz).
  31. Gilissen, Renske (2008, April 16): The role of attachment in young children’s media-induced fright reactions. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. R. van der Veer).
  32. Beijersbergen, Mariëlle (2008, April 10): Attachment and Coherence. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  33. Pannebakker, Fieke (2007, November 01): Contributions of attachment, temperament, and parenting to development of empathic concern: The Leiden Longitudinal Study. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  34. Van der Hal-Van Raalte, E.A.M. (2007, May 16). Early childhood Holocaust survival and the influence on well-being in later life. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & dr. D. Brom).
  35. Stolk, M.N. (2007, March 08). Parenting intervention and the caregiving environment: Cumulative risk and process evaluation. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & dr. J. Mesman).
  36. Alink, L.R.A. (2006, November 09). Early childhood aggression. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. F. Juffer, H.M. Koot, prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & dr. J. Mesman).
  37. Rutgers, A.H. (2006, June 13). Autism and attachment security. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. I.A. van Berckelaer-Onnes).
  38. Van Zeijl, J. (2006, June 07). Externalizing problems in 1-to-3-year-old children. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn, prof. dr. F. Juffer & dr. J. Mesman).
  39. Klein Velderman, M. (2005, November 24). The Leiden VIPP and VIPP-R study. Evaluation of a short-term preventive attachment-based intervention in infancy. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. F. Juffer).
  40. Jaffari-Bimmel, N. (2005, October 24). Development and adjustment of adopted adolescents: Longitudinal and concurrent factors. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. F. Juffer & prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  41. Bokhorst, Caroline L.  (2004, May 27). Attachment in twins. Universiteit Leiden.  (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn & prof. dr. C Schuengel (VU Amsterdam)).
  42. Van der Mark, Ingrid L.  (2001, September 12). The development of empathy and compliance in toddlers: The role of parenting, attachment, and temperament. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).
  43. Schuengel, Carlo (1996, November 06). Attachment, loss, and maternal behavior: a study on intergenerational transmission. Universiteit Leiden. (With: prof. dr. M.H. van IJzendoorn).

Memberships of scientific societies, editorial boards

  • 2015 - present Editorial Advisory Board Member of the Journal of Child Psychology & Psychiatry
  • 2015 – present Editorial Board Member of the Journal of Family Psychology
  • 2013 – 2019 present Member of the Publications Committee of the  Society for Research in Child Development
  • 2013   present Editorial Board Member of  Infant Behavior and Development
  • 2012 – present Consulting Editor of  Child Development
  • 2011 – present Editorial Board Member of  Child: Care, Health and Development
  • 2006 – present Associate Editor of  Attachment and Human Development

Teaching activities

  • Training in coding caregiver sensitivity with the Ainsworth and Erickson rating scales for observed parenting behavior (workshops) 2015- present
  • Attachment: State of the art (MA course) 2006-present
  • Attachment and developmental psychopathology (Research Master's course) 2006-present
  • Recent advances in developmental psychopathology (Research Master's course) 2006-present
  • Child and family studies (BA course) 1998-2005
  • Foundations of education and child studies (first-year course) 1993-2003
  • Numerous BA and MA theses 1993-present

Website Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg

See Dutch profile Marian Bakermans-Kranenburg

Professor of Neurobiological and Environmental Determinants of Parenting and Child Development

  • Faculteit der Sociale Wetenschappen
  • Instituut Pedagogische Wetenschappen
  • Algemene en Gezinspedagogiek

Work address

Pieter de la Court Building
Wassenaarseweg 52
2333 AK Leiden

Contact

Publications

No relevant ancillary activities