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Helena Ursic

Researcher

Name
H. Ursic LLM
Telephone
+31 71 527 8838
E-mail
h.ursic@law.leidenuniv.nl

Helena Uršič is since April 1, 2015 connected to the Institute for law and Digital technologies (eLaw) as researcher and PhD candidate.

More information about Helena Ursic

Leiden Law Blog

EuDEco website

Biography

From January 2018 to December 2018 Helena Ursic will be a Visiting Fellow of the Information Society Project at Yale Law School. During this period, her research will be focused on the study of individual rights under the GDPR in the context of big data. While in the United States, she will remain affiliated with Leiden Law School (eLaw) as a researcher and PhD candidate.

Helena joined eLaw in April 2015 to conduct research on legal aspects of the European data economy for the H2020 EuDEco project. She later embarked on her doctoral study, supervised by Professors Simone van der Hof and Bart Custers. 

Helena gave talks at multiple conferences workshops (among others, at Max Planck Institute in Munich, the University of Amsterdam, the University of Geneva and at the CPDP conference in Brussels) and she had a number of international and national publications on data protection, big data and law & technology. In the past two and a half years at eLaw, she was awarded several minor and one major academic grant. She is also a European Commission data protection and ethics expert and she teaches the Data Privacy course at Confiad Academy in Utrecht.

Helena is an alumna of Tilburg University (LLM International Business Law), where she graduated cum laude with a thesis on data protection in Dutch corporations. She worked as a privacy advisor for the global firm Ernst & Young between 2014 and 2015. Previous to that she graduated cum laude from the University of Ljubljana, where she received several awards including the Dean’s Award for the highest GPA and the Clifford Chance Award for the best memorandum at the Central and Eastern European Law Moot Court.

About Helena’s PhD research:  

Personal data is at the heart of the big data industry’s interests. While this type of data is considerably easy to be monetized, e.g., through behavioral advertising, it is also strictly regulated and protected on the human rights level. In the GDPR, the human-right component is most visibly reflected through the subjective rights that the law grants to data subjects. The right to be informed, the right to erasure, the right to object and the right to access are civilization achievements which were introduced in late eighties. All these rights are underpinned by one common vision, namely the control of individuals over their personal data. However, in the light of the recent big data revolution these concepts face a number of challenges.

Helena’s thesis aims to understand the set-up of data subject rights under the GDPR and explores their inefficiencies in the context of the big data economy. Furthermore, the thesis proposes some solutions to the shortcomings of the current system of data subject rights, notably a holistic approach to data protection.

Researcher

  • Faculteit Rechtsgeleerdheid
  • Instituut voor Metajuridica
  • eLaw@Leiden

Work address

Kamerlingh Onnes Building
Steenschuur 25
2311 ES Leiden
Room number Flex

Contact

External PhD candidate

  • Faculteit Rechtsgeleerdheid
  • Instituut voor Metajuridica
  • eLaw@Leiden

Work address

Kamerlingh Onnes Building
Steenschuur 25
2311 ES Leiden
Room number flex

Contact

Publications

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