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Christina Tsoraki

Guest Staff Member

Name
Dr. C. Tsoraki
Telephone
+31 71 527 2727
E-mail
c.tsoraki@arch.leidenuniv.nl

Christina Tsoraki is a researcher and a lecturer for the MSc-programme Material Culture Studies at Leiden University. She is currently acting as the course coordinator for the following courses: Seminar Material Culture Studies, Laboratory Studies and Master Thesis tutorial. She received a PhD in Prehistoric Archaeology in 2009 from the University of Sheffield, UK. Between 2013 and 2015 she held a Marie Curie Intra-European Research Fellowship at the Faculty of Archaeology at Leiden University. In 2008-2009 she held the Georchaeology Fellowship at the Wiener Laboratory at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece and in 2011 a research fellowship at the AEGIS-Aegean Interdisciplinary Studies research group, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium.

More information about Christina Tsoraki

Christina Tsoraki is a researcher and a lecturer for the MSc-programme Material Culture Studies at Leiden University. She is currently acting as the course coordinator for the following courses: Seminar Material Culture Studies, Laboratory Studies and Master Thesis tutorial. She received a PhD in Prehistoric Archaeology in 2009 from the University of Sheffield, UK. Between 2013 and 2015 she held a Marie Curie Intra-European Research Fellowship at the Faculty of Archaeology at Leiden University. In 2008-2009 she held the Georchaeology Fellowship at the Wiener Laboratory at the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, Greece and in 2011 a research fellowship at the AEGIS-Aegean Interdisciplinary Studies research group, Université Catholique de Louvain, Belgium.

Current research:

Christina’s current research interest is the formulation of interpretative frameworks for ancient economies. Focusing on micro-scale levels of analysis and following an artefact-based approach, her research addresses questions about the organisation and scale of production (communal and household control of production, domestic or specialised production), subsistence strategies and cross-craft interactions in order to consider how households operated as social units and how they interacted with other social, political and ideological structures in different periods.

Her Marie-Curie project CRAFTS ( Crafting networks in early farming societies) investigated the role of technology in the development of social networks. Employing different social units of analysis such as households, neighbourhoods, larger corporate groups, the project investigated the location and nature of craft and food-processing activities in early farming societies. Among the main objectives of the project are to: a) explore how the interactions afforded by technological processes may have contributed to the sharing of knowledge, materials and techniques among social groups (learning networks), and b) investigate the role of household- and community-based practices in creating and sustaining technological and social networks.

She is also involved as a specialist researcher (specialising in ground stone technology) in many archaeological projects in Greece, Cyprus and Turkey ranging in date from the Early Neolithic to the Archaic period. Since 2012 she has been the leader of the Ground Stone Team for the Çatalhöyük Research Project directed by Prof. I. Hodder (Stanford University, USA).

Guest Staff Member

  • Faculteit Archeologie
  • Archaeological Sciences
  • Material Culture Studies

Work address

Van Steenis Building
Einsteinweg 2
2333 CC Leiden
Room number FLEX

Contact

Publications

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