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Distant Justice: The Impact of the International Criminal Court on African Politics

Date
Thursday 10 October 2019
Time
Location
Anna van Buerenplein
Anna van Buerenplein 301
2595 DG The Hague
Room
Auditorium

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is struggling at every level of its operations in Africa - in terms of its investigations, prosecutions, and relations with domestic governments, judiciaries and affected communities. This raises key questions about whether, after 17 years of consistent shortcomings and mounting frustration even among some of its most ardent supporters, the Court can survive. A central cause of the ICC's travails is its remoteness from the societies in which it operates. The Court's conceptual and practical 'distance' from the places where crimes are committed greatly undermines its effectiveness and requires a major rethink about how international criminal justice is conducted, especially in the Global South. This also highlights the need for a major reorientation towards domestic processes.

At this seminar, Prof. Phil Clark will lay out the main arguments in his new book, "Distant Justice: The Impact of the International Criminal Court on African Politics" (Cambridge University Press). The book is based on 20 months of fieldwork in Uganda, the Democratic Republic of Congo and elsewhere in Africa and The Hague since 2006, including 650 interviews with ICC officials, domestic political, legal and civil society actors, and local communities.

Phil Clark is Professor of International Politics and Co-Director of the Centre on Conflict, Rights and Justice at SOAS University of London. His work focuses on mass conflict and its aftermath, including issues of transitional justice, reconciliation, peacebuilding and the politics of international criminal law. His latest book is "Distant Justice: The Impact of the International Criminal Court on African Politics" (Cambridge University Press), before which he published "The Gacaca Courts, Post-Genocide Justice and Reconciliation in Rwanda: Justice without Lawyers" (CUP). Previously, he was co-founder and convenor of Oxford Transitional Justice Research. He holds a DPhil in Politics from the University of Oxford, where he studied as a Rhodes
Scholar.

Discount copies of the book will be available at the event for 20 Euro.

Please register here.

 

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