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Lecture | Dean's Lecture

Urban Network Dynamics seen through the lens of High Definition Archaeology

  • Rubina Raja
Date
15 February 2018
Time
Series
Dean's Lectures
Address
Van Steenis Building
Einsteinweg 2
2333 CC Leiden
Room
Main hall

The case of Antiochia-on-the-Chrysorrhoas

High Definition methods applied to archaeological materials is nothing new. However, over the last years application of such methods on material coming from tightly definable contexts have given archaeologists the possibility to work with empirical material in a “High Definition” perspective, where “High Definition” does not mean micro-scale, but rather implies the precision with which cause and effect of change and continuity may be qualified to a much larger degree than earlier possible.

Gerasa

This lecture will focus on the work done within the framework of the Danish National Research Foundation’s Centre of Excellence for Urban Network Evolutions and in particular on the archaeological work carried out in the Decapolis city of Gerasa in modern Jordan. At this site archaeological investigations have taken place for more then a 100 years – beginning as far as we know in 1907 – but only since 2011 through the work done by the Danish-German Jerash Northwest Quarter Project high definition methods have been applied to the archaeological work undertaken at the site. Results of this work have yielded new insights into the urban network dynamics of this famous site, which flourished from the Roman into the early Islamic period, when city life came to a sudden halt as a result of the earthquake in 749 CE.

View from the Northwest Quarter in Gerasa/Jerash towards the Sanctuary of Zeus Olympios and the Oval Piazza. (copyright: Rubina Raja)
View from the Northwest Quarter in Gerasa/Jerash towards the Sanctuary of Zeus Olympios and the Oval Piazza. (copyright: Rubina Raja)

About the Dean's Lectures

The Dean’s Lecture is a high level series of lectures given by prominent archaeologists and intellectuals, in which they highlight their work and passion.

For these lectures, the Dean of the Faculty of Archaeology invites scholars who look beyond the boundaries of their own field of  chronological or topographical specialisation, addressing, in a compelling way, our archaeological community at large.