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Lecture

Research Seminars Series FGGA: Big Data Analytics for mitigating carbon emissions in smart cities: Opportunities and challenges

Date
Friday 15 April 2016
Time
Location
Stichthage
Koningin Julianaplein 10 (13e verdieping)
2595 AA The Hague
Room
13th floor, Bezuidenhout room

The first research seminar will take place on Friday April 15 from 15.30 to 17.00 in Stichthage (13th floor, Bezuidenhout room). Sarah Giest of the Institute of Public Administration (FGGA, Leiden University) will present a paper entitled Big Data Analytics for mitigating carbon emissions in smart cities: Opportunities and challenges” (see abstract below). The seminar will be followed by refreshments.

For more information about the seminar series, please contact Johan Christensen (j.christensen@fgga.leidenuniv.nl), Joris van der Voet (j.van.der.voet@fgga.leidenuniv.nl) or David Ehrhardt (d.w.l.ehrhardt@luc.leidenuniv.nl). 

No affiliation with Leiden University or registration is required to attend. We hope to see you all in the seminars!

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Big Data Analytics for mitigating carbon emissions in smart cities: Opportunities and challenges

Sarah Giest, Institute of Public Administration, FGGA, Leiden University

The paper addresses the growing skepticism around big data use in the context of smart cities. Big data is said to transform city governments into being more efficient, effective and evidence-based. However, critics point towards the siloed structure of data storage and the inability of big data to portray contextual particularities and local experiences of places. Solutions offered to overcome these weaknesses include the establishment of knowledge transfer entities that can make sense of big data in the urban context and utilizing ICT for open data hubs. On the basis of this, the paper investigates the challenges city governments face when dealing with big data in the context of carbon emission reduction. Through the lens of the policy capacity and evidence-based policy literature, the cities of Copenhagen (Denmark), Malmö (Sweden), Oxford (UK) and Vienna (Austria) are analyzed. The cases reveal that data silos exist and draw much of the attention of city governments towards building managerial and technological capacity and overshadow analytical capacity-building and knowledge transfer.

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