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Vitality and Ageing (MSc)

A brighter career

The Master's Vitality and Ageing provides you with the knowledge and skills needed to become an academic professional who is capable of improving the care and welfare of older people in ageing societies. You will be able to contribute to solutions for the challenges facing an ageing society.

Dorine van Staalduinen

V&A Alumna

Dorine van Staalduinen

"The combination of learning about different study methods and gaining experience in working as a researcher in a research team made the Master’s a perfect base for starting a PhD trajectory!"

Daan Kooijman

V&A Alumnus

Daan Kooijman

“During my clinical rotations I discovered that there's quite a bit more to being a doctor than just medical knowhow."

"Knowing which challenges the older individual faces, which challenges still lie ahead for us as a society and being able to think about ways to overcome them together is essential if we want to stay afloat. And that's exactly what the Master's Vitality & Ageing has to offer.”

Suzanne Debeij

V&A Alumna

Suzanne Debeij

“The Master’s Vitality & Ageing gave me broad knowledge about the field of elderly care. This is really useful in my multidisciplinary job as policy maker in a nursing home.”

Career opportunities

Over the last 5 years our alumni have proven to make a difference in the field of vitality and ageing. Alumni of the Master’s Vitality and Ageing start their careers in various academic positions. They mostly kick-off their careers as researcher, policy maker or continue with their medical career. Want to read more? Scroll down. 

Master Vitality and Ageing in Leiden: Alumni Stories

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Researcher - PhD

After completing the Master's Vitality and Ageing programme you’ll be perfectly positioned to start a scientific career as (junior) researcher or PhD candidate. Not only will it help you develop excellent skills in scientific writing and other scientific communication techniques, it will also acquaint you with the latest scientific research in the field. Furthermore, you’ll be able to expand your international network of scientists in the field of vitality and ageing. Click on the examples below to read more. 

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  • Dorine van Staalduinen PhD Student Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC)

    Dorine: “After the Master's Vitality & Ageing I started working at the LUMC on a PhD trajectory. Nice to know is that I got the job as a PhD-student through the network I had built up via the Master's. 

    My research is focused on the implementation of Value-Based HealthCare (VBHC). More specifically, I am studying which implementation strategies could be effective in order to establish interprofessional collaboration in VBHC-care teams. We do this with multiple study designs: currently we are conducting a cross-sectional study and after that we will start a quasi-experimental study.

    During the internship that is offered by the Master’s, I experienced how it is to work as a researcher in a research team. Also, the Master’s has multiple research courses on different study methods, both qualitative and quantitative, which I now find very useful in my work as a researcher. For me, the combination of both made the Master's a perfect base for starting a PhD trajectory!”

  • Diny Stekelenburg Researcher National center of expertise for long-term care (Vilans)

    Diny: "After I finished my V&A internship at a national center of expertise for long-term care, I was lucky enough to continue my career at this organization. In my current position I am mainly involved in (different types of) research in elderly care. The aspect I like most about my job is the diversity of subjects that I work on.

    When working with the older population, it is important to look beyond the border of one discipline and to be aware of all different facets related to ageing. The Master's facilitates this very well, with a broad range of discussed topics related to ageing, from biology of ageing to ageing in society.

    During the Master's, I developed an interest in many facets of ageing and in the interconnectedness between subjects. The extensive knowledge I acquired during the Master's allowed me to apply the wide focus of ageing in my job!"

Policy Maker

Many national and international organisations and governments have realised that our ageing society demands a new type of expert. Thanks to its international focus on how to better organise the ageing society, this Master’s programme constitutes the perfect stepping stone towards a career in healthcare organisations or governmental and non-governmental organisations. Click on the examples below to read more.

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  • Suzanne Debeij Policy maker quality Frankelandgroep

    Suzanne: “The Master’s Vitality and Ageing prepared me for my position as policy maker at Frankelandgroep. This is an organisation with daycare, home care and nursing home care. It taught me about the healthcare system, the regulations in elderly care and how to write policy in a world with a changing demographic. It showed me the importance of informal caregivers and seeing every individual as a unique person.

    When I’m writing policy I focus on the importance of the end users as a priority, as it is important that policy has to work for the elderly using our services. The Master’s taught me these specific skills, and also gave me broad knowledge about the field of elderly care, which is really useful in the multidisciplinary site as a nursing home.”

Medical Professional

The future of medicine is evolving, since the average age of patients admitted to hospital is 68 years, and expected to rise. Therefore, the amount of older adults in the daily activities of every medical specialism will increase. In combination with the Medical School, the Master's Vitality and Ageing forms an excellent supplement to your further medical education. Click on the examples below to read more.

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  • Daan Kooijman 6th year medical student

    Daan: "During my clinical rotations I discovered that there's quite a bit more to being a doctor than just medical knowhow. As more and more of the faces you'll find in your waiting room will be silver-haired and wrinkly-handed, you're expected to function as part of a healthcare system that still hasn't quite figured out how to keep up. How can a patient and their family cope after they've left your office? How far do you plan ahead? How do you coordinate their care with other professionals?

    T
    he ageing society is a fait accompli and something every medical professional has to work in, as an individual, but also together as caregivers. Knowing which challenges the older individual faces, which challenges still lie ahead for us as a society and being able to think about ways to overcome them together is essential if we want to stay afloat. And that's exactly what the Master's Vitality & Ageing has to offer."

  • Veerle van der Klei Geriatrics resident not in training (ANIOS) Leiden University Medical Center (LUMC)

    Veerle: "After the Master's Vitality & Ageing I felt better prepared on the psychosocial aspects of health, the important role of (in)formal caregivers and paramedics, the need for integrated elderly care and personal discussions about the quality- and eventually the end-of-life; all relevant topics for a future doctor in light of the current grey pressure.

    It also motivated me to organize my final medical rotations ranging from the academic geriatric ward to the nursing home: a very fulfilling end of medical school and the start of a career in the challenging and multidisciplinary field of geriatric medicine."

More career examples

V&A alumni work in all kinds of organisations. Some more examples:
  • Policy officer at Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sports (VWS)
  • Quality advisor in Nursing Home organisation
  • Consultant healthcare
  • Research assistant at Alzheimer Centre
  • Project manager in Nursing Home organisation
  • Traineeship at Healthcare Insurer
  • Support specialist at Healthcare Tech company
  • PhD trajectories (from biology to policy)

The need for V&A professionals in the working field

Results of our Vitality and Ageing alumni enquete show that most alumni work in a job related to the study (78%). They also find a job quickly: 75% has found a job within 3 months after graduating.

  • 78 % Job related to V&A
  • 22 % Job not related to V&A

Results V&A alumni enquête 2021 (cohort 2016-2019)

  • 50 % Job search < 1 month
  • 25 % Job search 1-3 months
  • 25 % Job search > 3 months

Results V&A alumni enquête 2021 (cohort 2016-2019)

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