Universiteit Leiden

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German Language and Linguistics (MA)

Career prospects

Create a world of opportunities with a master's degree from Leiden University.

As a graduate of the master's in German Language and Linguistics of Leiden University you will have a broad-range of career choices open to you. Alumni have found employment in the fields of trade and export, in communication departments in (international) companies, as teachers, policy advisors, translators or in libraries. If you want to pursue a research- or academic-based career, you can move onto the research-focused MA in Linguistics (Research).

Our graduates end up working in a diverse range of positions, examples include:

  • Translator
  • Author of educational materials
  • Project manager at a translation agency
  • Teacher
  • Consular officer at a ministry of foreign affairs
  • PhD candidate
  • Content manager/editor
  • Advisor at an institute focusing on linguistic research and language teaching

Teacher qualification

If you are interested in a career in teaching, you can apply for the Dutch-taught teacher-training MA at the ICLON Graduate School of Education after graduating from the master’s programme. To be admitted, you need to have a master’s degree in the  relevant discipline. Fluency in Dutch is mandatory, and additional entry requirements may apply.

A Leiden University degree

Leiden University master's graduates are sought-after employees at (inter)national organisations. Our graduates are known for their combination of robust academic training, in-depth and relevant knowledge, and critical, multidisciplinary approach to problem-solving.

In which sector do students find jobs?

  • 40.0 % Education
  • 12.0 % Culture, sports and recreation
  • 12.0 % Government and semi-government organisations
  • 8.0 % Non-profit (e.g. at an idealistic organization)
  • 8.0 % Business services
  • 8.0 % ICT
  • 12.0 % Miscellaneous

How successful are they in finding a job?

  • 88.0 % found a job within two months
  • 80.0 % found their first job at academic level
  • 92.0 % held a position at academic level when the study was carried out