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Science podcast

Leiden University will be recording a brand-new series of podcasts in 2019: Science Shots. Our top scientists will talk about their research in less than 15 minutes. Tip: something to enjoy on the train journey between Leiden and The Hague, our two University cities!

Episode 1: Women in history

In the first podcast we will be talking to Ariadne Schmidt, Professor by special appointment in the History of Urban Culture, in particular Leiden. We will be discussing Magdalena Moons, the heroine of the Relief of Leiden, and the role of women in history.

Episode 2: Drinking coffee with far-right extremists

PhD candidate Nikki Sterkenburg researches far-right extremist groups. But how do you contact such groups? And what do you do if you hear about possible crimes? Hear all about it in the second Science Shot.

Episode 3: A plunge into the cesspits of Leiden

In this Science Shot, archaeologist Roos van Oosten takes us on tour of the cesspits of Leiden. She reaches a surprising conclusion: the centre of Leiden in the Middle Ages was by no means as filthy as one might think.

Episode 4: Making an impact with scientific research

Industrial ecologist Benjamin Sprecher conducts applied research for the municipalities of Leiden and The Hague. But this is not as easy as it sounds. He explains why in this Science Shot.

Episode 5: How Rembrandt found his voice

Rembrandt lived long before audio and video recordings were invented. But a group of researchers has managed to reconstruct his voice. How? Lecturer in Dutch language, culture and literature, Olga van Marion, explains in this Science Shot.

Episode 6: How old is an asylum seeker?

Asylum seekers regularly give a different age in different EU countries. Why do they do this? And how do you know how old they really are? Immigration expert Mark Klaassen explains in our Science Shots podcast.

Episode 7: Why night owls have more health risks

Are you an owl or a lark? Your lifestyle can affect your health more than you might think. PhD candidate Wietse in het Panhuis is researching this at the LUMC with the aid of jet-lagged mice.

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