Universiteit Leiden

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Lezing

The Trump Administration and International Law

  • Professor Harold Koh
Datum
8 januari 2019
Tijd
Bezoekadres
Wijnhaven
Turfmarkt 99
2511 DP The Hague
Zaal
2.01

The Grotius Centre for International Legal Studies of Leiden University cordially invites you to a special lecture on

The Trump Administration and International Law
by Prof. Harold Koh

Harold Hongju Koh is Sterling Professor of International Law, former Dean (2004-09), and co-founder of the Rule of Law Clinic at Yale Law School, where he has taught since 1985. He served as Legal Adviser, U.S. Department of State from 2009-13; Assistant Secretary of State for Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor from 1998-2001; and Attorney-Adviser, Office of Legal Counsel, U.S. Department of Justice, from 1983-85. He has testified regularly before Congress and has argued at the U.S. Supreme Court, the International Court of Justice and many other domestic and international courts.  A Fellow of the American Philosophical Society and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, he has received seventeen honorary degrees, more than thirty human rights awards, and the Wolfgang Friedmann Prize from Columbia Law School’s Journal of Transnational Law and the Louis B. Sohn Award from the American Bar Association's International Law Section for his lifetime achievements in international law.

On Harold Koh's "The Trump Administration and International Law" book

Will Donald trump international law? Since Trump's Administration took office, this question has haunted almost every issue area of international law. One of our leading international lawyers argues that President Trump has thus far enjoyed less success than many believe, because he does not own the pervasive "transnational legal process" that governs these issue areas. 

This book shows how those opposing Trump's policies during his administration's first two years have successfully triggered that process as part of a collective counter-strategy. Koh's tour d'horizon illustrates the many techniques that players in the transnational legal process have used to blunt Trump's early initiatives. The high stakes of this struggle, and its broader implications for the future of global governance - now challenged by the rise of populist authoritarians - make this exhausting counter-strategy both worthwhile and necessary. 

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